What Nobody Told You About Becoming a Manager/Leader

Of the many millennial clients I coach, at least 80% of them aspire for managerial positions after completing 6 to 7 years of work experience. While it is definitely an exciting and exhilarating experience with opportunities to grow and learn, it is not without its challenging and stressful moments. There would be situations that would frustrate you so much so that you miss your glorious and carefree days of being an individual contributor! Managers by their role definition, represent their team before their management and vice versa. Being the mediator is never easy, and managerial positions are by far the most stressful roles one can take on in a corporate setup.

As a first-time manager, I was aware of what I assumed were my expected roles and responsibilities. The first three years were a revelation. There were so many aspects and challenges that nobody told me about. There were days I used to dread Mondays and then there were days I felt like going back to an individual contributor role!

Here are some truths I have attempted to list down, with a few tips on how to deal with these challenges. Some are based on personal experience while others are based on experiences shared by other managers/leaders during our coaching and other discussions.

Fact #1: You are constantly being judged

Like a laboratory specimen, you are constantly under scrutiny. While there are a few who would encourage you, the sad reality is there are many who would love to see you fail. Being a first-time manager, you are likely to make mistakes. These mistakes would be blown out of proportion or used against you.

The one way you could ensure you have more support from your team and your supervisor is to constantly communicate and share your decisions. Admit your mistakes, however do not feel shy about expressing your accomplishments no matter how small they may appear to you. Provide regular updates and most of all – make sure you are highly visible and build a strong rapport with your team, your peers, and your supervisor.

Fact #2: You cannot take people at face value

Our corporate system still follows the age-old hierarchical process where the manager’s verdict holds more than 70% weightage in the employee’s performance rating. Naturally you will fall prey to office politics. The introverts and the shy ones might fall behind while the louder ones will be more successful in attempting to influence you. Some would flatter you while others would pretend to be on their best behaviour when you are around. Being new, you might want to implement new ideas. You may find many Yes-men (or women) agreeing with you. The flipside is, the others who see you succumb to the manipulation would feel disillusioned and become easily influenced by your detractors.

You will have to find a way to have objective yet personalized one-to-one interactions with everyone reporting to you. You will eventually be able to see an emerging political pattern. While it would be tempting to rely on those who seem to be your ardent supporters, it is important that you also focus on those who appear withdrawn during meetings and discussions. If it isn’t already implemented in your organization, you might want to consult your HR department on whether you could conduct an anonymous feedback survey within your team to help them voice their concerns or observations about you. It is never easy hearing negative things about oneself, but you have to bite the bullet if you want your team fully supporting you.

Fact #3: You have to put up with whiners and naysayers

This is perhaps the most unpleasant aspect of being a leader, at least for me. Most of us, (including myself), personally enjoy having team members who bring up counter-arguments to ideas on the table. Healthy opposition and debates, besides building trust within the team, also help in implementing a plan that has everyone’s consensus. It is the whiners and constant complainers who weigh you down with their negativity. A whiner is someone who always has someone to blame for his or her own mistake. Then there are those who resent a new boss and resist any changes proposed. They may not complain, but behave in a passive-aggressive manner that clearly shows their obvious disapproval. Perhaps what is frustrating about them is not the fact that they object to your ideas or suggestions, but that they seem to take everything personally.

You might want to get to know such people and show your willingness to listen to their ideas. Lending an empathetic ear helps – especially for those who might be affected by the changes you implement. However if you find this person constantly against you at every turn, it might help having a heart-to-heart talk with the individual letting him or her know how you need his or her support. You might want to let the person vent their views and listen with an open mind. At the best you might be able to turn around the situation. At the worst, you may have to assertively let them know you are the boss and that much as you appreciate their skills and contribution, you will not put up with negativity. In any case, it is important to keep track of any insubordination and make sure you communicate any warnings to this employee in writing.

Fact #4: You are the bearer of all bad news

Once a manager, you represent the executive leadership and the organization in every way. Be it a performance appraisal review feedback, the sunset of an old technology, organizational changes, or impending layoffs or salary-cuts, you have to be the one communicating unpalatable news in a diplomatic manner. Of course the most difficult job of all is letting people go if the business situation so demands. It would take immense amount of patience, tact, sensitivity, and most of all, compassion in communicating to the people affected by the decision.

Under no circumstances should you ever communicate bad news via email. Always get everyone together and maintain eye contact when you communicate bad news. After the group meeting, set up individual face-to-face meetings to demonstrate your willingness to listen. Your team will never forget the way you handled crisis situations, and you will win their support based on how well you faced the crisis and stood up to your people.

As for performance appraisals, I personally believe in monthly reviews. This ensures that your team is provided goals and a performance update on a regular basis. Also, you get to know how your team responds to your leadership.

Fact #5: You are lonely

Heavy is the head that wears the crown. Lonely is the employee who wears the leadership mantle. Wearing a mask of control and poise at all times can be quite burdensome. You can never get too pally with a team member. Even a harmless lunch with your supervisor or team member could be perceived as political by others. It is even tougher when you get promoted to a managerial position from within the same team. At least in India, it is difficult for people to separate the role from the individual. You can never be too close to people who report into you. You have to maintain a professional balance in your relationship.

It helps tremendously having a leadership mentor or coach on board, who acts as a sounding board for leaders and enables them to confidently deal with challenging situations and behaviours by coaching them on a regular basis. As a manager, you could also form a forum with other similar first-time managers where you could meet together on a monthly basis to discuss and share common areas of concern.

The Importance of Having a Coach on Board

I can never stress enough on the importance of having a mentor or coach who can be the “go to” person for all managers. Having a robust leadership development vision is not enough. It is absolutely critical for growing organizations today to implement a leadership development framework that not only develops and nurtures budding leaders, but also provides them with need-based and timely support to help them learn from the challenges that arise. Today’s leaders also need to be change agents who influence and facilitate major transitions and transformations within the organization by effectively dealing with day-to-day tactical challenges, similar to those listed above. This can be a very tough role to play. Having an experienced leadership mentor and coach on board is no longer a desirable option. It is a vital requirement for today’s organizations if they want to sustain and grow their high potential leadership talent.

The First Step to Wooing Talent

(Published on LinkedIn on Jan 26, 2015)

The other day I got a call from someone part of a company’s recruitment team. As she read out the job description of the role in discussion, I realized she had not even read my resume completely. When I politely inquired as to whether she had my latest resume, she airily brushed me off saying how big the company is (which the company in question definitely is), and that how rigorous their hiring process is. By the time she was done, I got the impression she couldn’t care less whether I was interested in the job or not. “Take it or leave it”, was the unspoken statement. Till I talked to her, I used to regard very highly the company in question. After this “interview”, the sheen had dulled somewhat.

Why is it that some companies spend a significant amount of their budgets in marketing and promoting their brand, but seem to ignore or dilute their first step towards acquiring talent?

Courtesy, the forgotten skill

This is one of my pet peeves. Why can’t we be nice to candidates over the phone? Many years back when I was part of a smaller company, I did not have the luxury of an assistant when I had to hire my team. As we were a small company, I was conscious of making a good first impression. To me, the candidate was the customer and I was aware that I was the first point of contact from our company. As the company grew we took care to ensure our recruitment team continued to take care of every prospect they called and briefed over the phone.

I guess sounding snooty might make one sound exclusive and important especially when screening on behalf of a big company, and there are people who might feel privileged that they even got a call. I also agree that the economic downturn has resulted in more eager jobseekers desperate for employment. However, times do change and the tides do turn. And people never forget how they were treated. They don’t remember the recruiter. They remember the company.

Till date when I interview people I think of how important this job must be for them and how worried they might be about the outcome. While most of them might not make it, I always go out of my way to make sure they have a positive interview experience. I have had my share of positive experiences as a candidate too, and I still regard those companies highly.

The importance of homework

I remember another recruiter who called me up a few years back for a senior level position as an e-learning team lead. As he asked me various questions, there is one that really surprised me: “I understand you have developed e-learning projects, but have you done instructional design?” It clearly demonstrated to me that he was simply “scanning” my speech to see whether it matched the job description instead of truly understanding the role!

The importance of researching the role and understanding the industry in question cannot be emphasized enough. When I was hiring instructional designers for my team at a time when e-learning was new in India, the recruitment team I was working with did not know much about the e-learning industry. We scheduled many meetings to give them an overview of the industry, besides showing them how e-learning courses looked like and what goes into developing them. We also provided them a list of skills, jargon words, keywords and the likes to help them understand the various terms used. This helped the recruiters not only in selecting the right resumes and identifying some of the best candidates, but also widening the search to other sources.

Putting the best person forward

As a candidate, I form an impression about the company depending on who talks to me first about the job. If I’m someone with 10 years of experience being considered for a mid-level senior role, I would like the recruiter to understand the role from my perspective. For that to happen, the recruiter needs to have the necessary experience and confidence talking to candidates about the role. Too often we have recruiters struggling to match pace with the candidate’s seniority during phone screening. Either they sound too deferential and in awe, or too immature. I have seen many recruitment teams putting their junior-most members to the task of screening candidates over the phone. I would recommend that we in fact put senior level professionals in charge of these interactions. Being experienced they would be able to match their tone to that of the candidate, have the confidence to pitch the job correctly, be intuitive enough to ask the right questions, and represent their organizations credibly. They would also be able to instinctively identify the right people without even seeing them face-to-face, within minutes into the discussion, thus saving precious time.

Making the first cut count

Phone screening sounds like a routine no-brainer task, but is in fact an implicit sales call. It is a highly crucial activity which when done right can save an organization huge costs. Do it right, and your candidates will gladly refer you to their friends and contacts.

Job openings are going to be higher in 2015 as compared to previous years if we were to go by most recruitment trend reports. Recruiters are going to be overworked. At the same time, the talent shortage is going to be more acute than ever before. You don’t want to lose out on a great candidate at the first stage itself. As the talent demand versus supply gap widens in 2015, companies should monitor this process to ensure they are represented well in the hiring market.

Good talent is ripe and available for picking. Somewhere in the race for numbers we tend to forget the basics. As the late Maya Angelou said, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Big Idea 2015: Coaching – the key to change and innovation

Peter Drucker once said, “If you want something new, you have to stop doing something old.” I would like to add that, “If you want new ideas, you need to stop old practices.”

Our personal and work lives and habits are cluttered with mindless activities and rote practices. When was the last time we ignored the chime of our incoming emails or notifications? Here you are, trying to think of a new marketing plan, and “ping!” goes your smartphone! Rather than ignoring, you pick up your phone to check what it’s all about. You get sucked into yet another never-ending quagmire of responses and actions triggered by that communication. When you get back to the marketing plan, you are back to square one, struggling hard to get started. We run our lives exactly like that in the autopilot mode, dancing and reacting to external triggers and distractions. Over a period, we accumulate a whole pile of useless clutter into our brains and realize we have wasted a huge chunk of our times and lives without a second thought.

Organizational versus Organic change

While organizations struggle to introduce and implement change at a macro level, our old habits, thinking, practices, and judgement continue to remain the same at a micro subconscious level. While the organizational system wants new technologies and new processes to bring about the change, the organic system operates as a monotonic congregation of robotic actions and habits. The result? Acute discomfort leading to total rebellion against changing status quo.

Two of the top burning issues over the past few years include severe talent scarcity and lack of innovation. Could it be because we have stopped thinking too deeply and simply comply with everything around us? How do we attract the right people into our lives and our teams, and how do we attract great ideas?

2015 – A turning point

2015 would mark a significant milestone in corporate history. Baby boomers will be close to retirement, most leaders and mentors will be from Gen X, while the mainstream will be flooded with versatile, technology-savvy, and multi-talented Millennials. There will be a shift of power and roles between these generations. As the population of Millennial will be more than ever before, here’s where bulk of the talent would lie. What worked for Gen X may not work simply because the technological and economic landscape is different. The motivating factors for Millennials to stick around is different as Anne Fisher has explained in this article. It is exactly because of this reason that we need to bring about change at a fundamental in the way we think, work, and achieve results.

Why Coaching?

For successful change management, every individual part of the exercise has to consciously and willingly agree to change either their mindsets, habits, or behaviours.

For change to occur at a micro level, it is more important than ever before to dedicate exclusive time for the brain. Coaching is a unique process where an individual works with a coach to articulate, analyse, detail, and plan their future actions. The coach asks purely open ended questions and facilitates the entire process through activities and exercises to help the individual look at the situation objectively from all angles and perspectives. It is sort of an “out of body” experience where the individual is encouraged to look at problems and challenges without judgement or external influence. The individual arrives at his own ideas and solutions during this process. This makes decision-making a completely mindful exercise. As the individual gets regularly coached, she gets more insights and awareness into her behavior and becomes a willing participant in change.

Benefits of coaching for the organization

  • Promotes a culture for change—Imagine this process happening across the organization where every employee is encouraged to get coached. Rather than pushing changes down employees’ throats, coaching could be a way to get employees to embrace the change after considering all aspects and benefits. This change in mindset leads to an organizational culture that intelligently participates in the entire change process.
  • Builds synergy within all generations of workforce— As millennials take center stage in the next decade, they will need to extract the best out of the more experienced and seasoned Baby Boomer and Gen X workforce, who can be deployed as coaches and mentors.
  • Develops emotionally intelligent leadership—A large part of EQ comes out of self-awareness and mindfulness. Coaching helps leaders and managers to reflect and improve their behavior and actions by enabling them to become more empathetic people leaders and better decision-makers
  • Drives empowerment and active innovation—Innovation already exists within individuals as a tiny unexplored glimmer of an idea. This idea usually gets clouded and eclipsed by legacy processes, assumptions, and indecisiveness and as a result, dies a quick death. As coaching is all about exploring the mind and heart towards newer solutions and behaviours, it automatically helps employees manifest and expand their ideas, and gives them the courage to take first steps towards implementing new solutions. Latent skill transforms to active talent, leading to active innovation.
  • Increases employee engagement and loyalty—It is now known that employee engagement largely depends on an employee’s emotional connect with the company management, brand, and organization. Through coaching, employees not only work on their career progression, they also take responsibility for their overall well-being and self-development. Leaders and managers too demonstrate a willingness to participate in their employees’ overall development and career planning. Coaching at the executive level helps organizational leaders to think beyond quarterly business results, and outline a more holistic and people-oriented vision. Once coaching becomes an intrinsic part of the company culture, over a period of time, employees begin to see a better alignment between their individual goals and the organization’s vision, and feel more invested in the company.

If a company needs to change its strategy, it has to get buy-in from its employees and customers. Unfortunately getting stakeholders to participate in the change process is easier said than done. If questions and ideas are not encouraged at an individual level, any change management exercise becomes an expensive promotional campaign followed by a “my way or the high way” stance.
That said, developing a coaching culture is a fairly long-term strategy and involves whole-hearted commitment from the company’s top management. Merely training managers to become certified coaches is not enough. 2015 should hopefully see companies building, driving, and executing a concrete talent management strategy using coaching and mentoring as key drivers.

The Road not Taken: Becoming a Full-time Mum Made Me a Better Leader

(Published on LinkedIn on Nov 21, 2014)

After 13 years of a glorious career in Mumbai, when I moved to Pune with our two daughters to join my husband, little did I know what life had in store for me. Back in Mumbai, like most Indian women, I used to live with my in-laws who took care of my children. When I arrived in Pune, I was very excited at the prospect of setting up a home of our own. I had it all neatly planned. Find a home on rent, set it up, enroll our older daughter in a school, find a daycare for the younger one, and find a job.

I was fortunate to be able to check off all of these items from my list, and within six months, I got hired by a growing company as a Vice President. I was over the moon to say the least! I hired a domestic assistant to help me with my household and kitchen chores, and I was all set. My new job was very exciting. The company was getting ready for an acquisition, and they had plenty of international projects and processes that needed streamlining, and new managers who needed mentoring and direction. It was a role right up my alley, and I had tons of ideas whirring inside my head. As the clients were scattered around the globe, managing my time schedules was challenging to say the least, but I was raring to go out there and make a mark.

Everything went smoothly for a while, and then things suddenly changed. My older daughter found her new school very intimidating. She was finding it very difficult adjusting to the new study pattern, her teachers, and her new friends. Moreover she missed coming home to her grandparents (which I didn’t realize). All this resulted in her dwindling test scores. One day as I was addressing a meeting with my team, I felt a weight pressing down on my shoulders. It was Guilt rearing its ugly head, but I ignored it.

After a few weeks, I found myself watching my domestic help cooking vegetables in more oil than that was necessary. Since she had to wrap up the kitchen work before I left for work, she used to work at top speed and in the process, ended up wasting resources. More flour, more detergent, more oil. I could see the wastage, and my shoulders sagged a little more.

Having two little children is not without its own challenges, is what I slowly realized. They fall sick (especially when you have an important meeting), they need help with their homework, they need help with their art projects, they need proper nutrition and care. Mostly, they need someone to just listen.

One evening after I completed three months, I lost my temper at my younger daughter. She was barely three, and wanted to play with me. Of late, I was finding it difficult dealing with her tantrums, without realizing that she needed me to spend time with her when I got home. But there I was on my laptop, drafting apology emails to clients and reviewing some reports, all so that I could be better prepared for my next day’s meeting. So while my daughter’s little hands tugged at me, I just absent-mindedly handed her a toy, asking her to play with it while “mamma completed her office work”. My shoulders were weighing a ton, and I also started suffering from stress headaches. The Guilt meter was way up there.

When I completed six months in the job, something happened that was the turning point in my life. My older daughter had got low scores yet again and I thought of staying up late helping her with her studies. I had to get into an “urgent client email” once again. My younger one called out to me asking if I could please give her a goodnight hug. I nodded at her promising I will soon enough. It took me a stressful two hours to finally shut down my laptop, and I saw both my girls fast asleep. As I saw their innocent peaceful faces, my Guilt meter tore into me. I was finally feeling guilty about ME. I was missing out not only on their childhood, but also on the gift of parenthood.

The very next day, I handed over my resignation.

For the next three years I was a full-time mother. These years have been the most precious and humbling years for me. I acquired a deep respect for my in-laws and women who chose their kids over their careers. I discovered a new passion – cooking. I put my corporate experience into practice at home by streamlining my kitchen operations! My headaches vanished, and I joined a gym where I was able to shed off those stress tires.

I have finally gotten back to a mainstream corporate career over the past eight years, and life couldn’t be better. Besides being a mentor to women, I am also a coach for women seeking to grow in leadership positions. Assertiveness, decision-making, delegation, empathy, being a role-model – all these are leadership skills that I learnt by staying at home.

Of course, there is always a pay-off. My career trajectory took a considerable dip. And of course, there IS a glass ceiling and there IS discrimination against women. More so against women who take a sabbatical for their families.

Do I regret that decision to choose my children over my career? The company from where I had resigned, eventually got acquired by a large multinational. Had I continued I would have probably been at an executive level by now. However would I have survived the enormous guilt of not following my heart? The first thing I did after quitting my job was to tutor my older daughter. That year, she stood in the toppers list of her class. I watched her with blurred eyes as she was being felicitated by her school. Yes, I am happy I chose to be a mother.

“Enjoy the little things, for one day you may look back and realize they were the big things.” – Robert Brault

#RoadNotTaken #ProfessionalWomen #Leadership #Women #Homemaker #Motherhood #WhatInspiresMe #Careers

So what is work culture really?

The other day, I overheard an employee talking to her friend about her company’s awesome work culture. “They give unrestricted Internet access, I get to use Facebook and Google Chat! My boss is so cool – he is my Facebook friend. We have such fun in the office!” It was obvious to me that this employee was someone who might have started her job, less than two years ago at an age when the office appears to be an extended college campus. I wondered what her sentiments would be once she completed five years in the same company. Would she be happy about getting to network on Facebook, or unhappy that she didn’t get a chance to make her resume stronger?

So what is work culture, really?

Culture, as a generic term, represents the collective behavior of a community of people and their collective response to external and internal situations.

To understand this better, let’s draw a parallel between family culture and work culture.

A family is a group of different individuals brought together through marriage and child birth. A company is again a group of individuals brought together for business reasons. What then makes them successful?

Leading with purpose

By leader, I don’t mean a patriarchal head. It could mean both parents working together with a united sense of purpose and steering the family towards that purpose. How does the child learn to make his own decisions? By sounding off his thoughts and feelings to his parents and understanding the possible outcomes. His parents are his compass and he looks towards them to understand which way to go. In families with single parents, the single parent has to play the role of a responsible leader who steers the way ahead.

An organization has to indicate and communicate a strong sense of vision and purpose that echoes in everything they do. While cafeterias, unrestricted Internet, camaraderie might help in attracting employees for a while, it’s the feeling of working for someone, and towards something big that truly excites and motivates them. Everyone loves being part of a big dream, a vision – even the skeptics!

Moral values and trust

Every child learns moral values like ethics, integrity, and respect from parents. Do my parents show respect towards the less fortunate? How do they respond to temptation? Do they exercise their vote? Are they sensitive about the environment? Do they treat the lesser-privileged with respect? It’s not what the parents say, but how they respond and behave. Do they keep their word, or do a volte-face when it’s the time of reckoning?

Does the leadership walk the talk? When employees complain, does management take them seriously by at least hearing them out? When customers are unhappy with their products, does the organization do what is right for the customers? Companies that let managers talk rudely to their employees can be rest assured that these employees may not treat their customers well. Such managers may look smart on the company’s portfolio, but their unhappy teams slowly stop performing and finally get disengaged from the company. Demonstrating integrity takes a lot of courage. Deep down we are idealists. We respect warriors and the brave who take courageous decisions.

Opportunities to learn and grow

Their children’s education is one of the highest priorities in every parents’ lives. Ensuring quality education, a conducive learning and supportive environment at home, and opportunities for overall development – these are the core driving factors parents consider while educating their child. Good food, gifts, a comfortable car, or a tutor – parents are willing to spend so long as they can ensure the child gets motivated and encouraged to study well.

Investing in an employee is more than providing incentives, or free Internet. Is there is a growth plan for them? What future roles can they grow into? How can employees be developed for these future roles? How do we motivate and inspire them to grow? How can we encourage them to give their best? Each of us craves for opportunities to do something new and exciting. Continuous learning opportunities combined with a long-term and robust self-development plan almost always ensures your star performers stay and help in creating more successors for you!

Unity in diversity

It’s rare for a family to have individuals with exactly the same personality! Egos clash, conflicts arise, tempers fly, resentments flare. It’s okay. As long as there is understanding, trust, respect, and acceptance and a sense of long-term purpose, it’s okay. Understanding and respecting each other’s differences helps a family bond better.

Employees do understand and would easily tolerate a leaky air conditioner, a nasty customer call, a poor product, or even an occasional bad boss, so long they believe the leadership will listen to their problems and fix them at the earliest. In times of adversity, employees look up to their leadership to see how they bring everyone together, motivate them, and help them deal with the situation.

A sense of belonging

It’s said that a family that prays together, stays together. Some families dedicate an hour every day where they eat dinner together and talk. Some of them go out for a movie once a month. Laughing together, eating together, or even cleaning the house together promotes a sense of shared purpose and belonging.

How often does leadership communicate with the employees? Is it through impersonal emails or face-to-face address? Does the leadership create an environment where they interact with their employees informally? Does the organization create opportunities for employees to walk up to top leadership to share their ideas and suggestions? Do managers roll up their sleeves and work with their teams or at least be available and approachable when employees struggle with challenging tasks?

Emotional security

“How was your day?” “How are you feeling?” “Let me help you with your homework”. These questions let the child know that he is loved and cared for. In return, the child takes efforts to support his parents and take accountability of his responsibilities willingly. The most important point here is there is no expectation on either side. The support and care is unconditional. This is true even when there is more than one child. Do parents compare siblings and spark rivalry or promote healthy competition by appreciating their differences?

Do managers at all levels take time to ask employees about their families or their insecurities? Do managers recognize their people and willingly give the right ones their due credit? Does the company promote team work and encourage credit sharing? The point to be noticed here is tying compensation to recognition is like gifting a smartphone to only one of the siblings who scored better grades. It may make the system of rewards easy, but causes deep and lasting emotional damage. We like being recognized and noticed – not necessarily with money! Being genuinely appreciated and recognized, encourages employees all the more, and you no longer have to worry about whether or not the job will get done.

Culture is not HR’s responsibility alone

Every child learns at a very young age on what is an absolute No-No. Parents may be forgiving about many things, but even the most liberal of them have certain mandates or non-negotiable rules. No lying or cheating. No disrespecting others. No foul language, please.

It’s not possible for one individual or department to take on work culture as their responsibility. The top leadership has to define the policies and code of conduct. They also need to live the values they propagate in their interactions with one another, or to their employees. HR can be a vehicle to drive and implement culture, but it really is the onus of the steer-leaders of the organization on what culture they manifest before their employees. It’s not only how top management talks during public address, but also during informal occasions.

Companies that take work culture seriously will have employees as their staunchest advocates. Such companies don’t have to work hard to find talent outside. They will find them within, consequently saving on huge costs of hiring and retaining employees. These employees in turn will work with complete dedication and accountability, and think like entrepreneurs and stakeholders of the company during all interactions with customers and the general public. Such companies also have ex-employees willing to join them back. The feeling of goodwill and positive word-of-mouth can be contagious and have far-reaching benefits like employee loyalty and customer loyalty. Like one of my friends pointed out to me, the 26/11 attack at the Taj Hotel in Mumbai is a case in point. At the risk of their lives, the hotel staff and the General Manager did whatever they could to protect and shelter their guests trapped during the terrorist attack. Many perished in their attempt. They had the choice of fleeing from the situation or leaving the job of rescuing their guests to the security agency. Nonetheless, they laid down their lives for their customers, because of their high sense of commitment, ownership and belonging to their employer.

Work culture cannot exist in silos. Like ripples in water, culture of an organization spreads from the top management and percolates down to all levels. It may sound like a sentiment, but the effects of a strong work culture can neither be ignored nor undermined. While the sales figures might dip or peak over the months, work culture is that simple yet nebulous aspect that can take a small company from mediocrity to great heights.